Category Archives: Uncategorised

The contribution of the voluntary sector to health and wellbeing in Humber, Coast and Vale

Policy&Practice has been commissioned by the Humber, Coast and Vale Health and Care Partnership to provide robust intelligence on the work of the voluntary, community and social enterprise sector (VCSE).

Its aim is to inform debate on how to enhance understanding of the impact the VCSE makes through formal partnership working arrangements, by delivering services under contract, and by undertaking activities of a complementary nature that sustain or strengthen the health and wellbeing of the local population.

The area studies includes the following unitary local authorities and county council districts: East Riding of Yorkshire, City of Kingston upon Hull, North Lincolnshire, North East Lincolnshire and the unitary authority City of York, together with six of seven North Yorkshire County Council Districts: Hambleton, Harrogate, Richmondshire, Ryedale, Scarborough and Selby.

The analysis builds on work published in 2021 for West Yorkshire Combined Authority, together with the Health and Care Partnerships for West Yorkshire and Harrogate, and Humber, Coast and Vale, Yorkshire Sport Foundation, Community First Yorkshire, and Two Ridings Community Foundation.

This research aims to dig deeper into the available data on VCSE sector activity in Humber, Coast and Vale Health and Care Partnership area in order to explore the purpose and extent of support provided and to find out where such support is distributed. It is hoped that the report will help inform debate about the role the VCSE can or should play in supporting health and wellbeing in communities.

In area context, the final report will explore the extent to which VCSE organisations engage directly with local authorities and health organisations by delivering public services under contract and engaging in formal partnership working arrangements.

Early analysis indicates that formal contracts to deliver public services only represents the tip of the iceberg of the overall contribution of the VCSE sector. Consequently, the research will  also looks at less direct contributions that VCSE organisations make to public health and wellbeing by working on issues such as building people’s confidence to manage their lives, tackling social isolation and improving access to services.

The final report will be published in February 2022.

The Structure, dynamics and potential of the voluntary sector in Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly

Policy&Practice has been commissioned to undertake a statistical analysis of the structure, dynamics and impact of the voluntary, community and social enterprise sector in Cornwall and Isles of Scilly by Voluntary Sector Forum Cornwall and the Cornwall Clinical Commissioning Group. The work is taking forward analytical approaches recently developed in a study in Yorkshire and Humber

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The research. which is being undertaken by Professor Tony Chapman, provides an opportunity for comparative analysis with Cornwall’s proximate neighbours and also statistical neighbours in the North of England. This helps to show how the area is different or similar from other areas which share a range of characteristics.

The purpose of the work, from a commissioners point of view, is to examine the current capacity of the local VCSE, but also to look at its potential to engage further with the strategic ambitions of Cornwall Council and local NHS health and social care organisations.

The research will be published in February 2022 and will be followed up with an online event to debate the findings and their relevance to current and future policy initiatives with VCSE and public sector stakeholders.

Why do community businesses choose to take on below-cost contracts?

A new study for Power to Change, published this week, reveals that community businesses often sign up to deliver public service contracts in the knowledge that they will make a financial loss. The authors of the study, Professor Tony Chapman and Dr Tanya Gray of Policy&Practice at St Chad’s College, Durham University, said the trend was driven by the community business sector’s commitment to social and financial success when judging contract values. One CEO said:

‘We’ve gone for certain contracts that we feel are crucial to our community. We provide services to people who have quite complex needs. We might not be making any money on it, the reality is that we’re contributing about 12 per cent. But we think it is so important, that we’re prepared to do it because nobody else could do it properly at this price.

’Professor Tony Chapman, who co-authored the report, said:

“The trend is not down to acts of financial desperation, nor that community businesses are complicit in a ‘race to the bottom’ in contract pricing. But community business leaders knew that if profits on contracts were out of the question, then they’d have to make up the difference from other aspects of their trading to sustain vital services.”

Resolving these pressures is virtually impossible for community businesses. So the onus is on local public sector organisations to be more realistic about contract values. But that is easily said in the current fiscal climate. And even though Chancellor, Sajid Javid, announced in this September’s Spending Review that ‘austerity is over’, what this really means is that, at best, things will get no worse.

Suzanne Perry, Research Officer at Power to Change, said: “This research gives us excellent insight into the extent to which community businesses are sacrificing in order to keep local services open in their neighbourhoods. Additionally, the report reveals what adept business people they are – utilising their income to make the place they live better.”

There’s little to be gained by pointing at Public Services (Social Value) Act of 2012. The reality is that public sector bodies need an enormous boost in funding to bring them anywhere near back to where they were in 2010. In the meantime, local public bodies should be applauding community businesses which keep services going in their communities – rather than to assume that they’ll continually be willing and able to do ‘more for less’.

Striking a balance: How community businesses build effective working relationships with public, private and third sector organisations, by Professor Tony Chapman and Dr Tanya Gray. Published 18th September 2019.

Click here for Tony Chapman’s Blog on the report

Click here to download the report

 

St Chad’s Chaplain

Congratulations to our Chaplain, David Rushton, for passing his Master of Theology (Chaplaincy Studies) from Cardiff University with merit.  The title of his dissertation is: “In which direction do we face?  A study of how Church of England chaplains operate within secular institutions as they seek to serve both the Church and the employing institution.”

A relieved-looking chaplain about to submit his dissertation.

 

Reading Allowed (or the Chad’s Dead Poets’ Society)

Reading Allowed had its first meeting this Saturday past.  Around 15 people came, many to share, some just to listen. We squeezed into a snug little room in Grad’s building. This, alongside the hot drinks and dim lamplight, added to the cosiness. We kicked off with a short children’s story about arrogant raindrops. Reading passed anticlockwise around the circle; with teas, hot chocolates and coffees frantically assembled in the intervening spaces. We had a huge variety of pieces: from Hungarian poetry to Silmarillion to Plath to two people’s own work to a passage on fecal analysis from a non-fiction book on wolves. We have no particular limitations on what can be read; speeches and song lyrics being examples of other writing people may share in the future.

There are currently around 26 people on the chat where we organise the meetings. As it is open-invite, more people are slowly trickling in as their friends recommend it. Overall it was a sort of gender-diverse Dead Poets’ Society; something that we didn’t realise until we actually started. There is another one planned this Saturday, hopefully then continuing every other week.

P.S. Much as we love a pun, we’re hoping that a quote will be shared at some point that makes for an even more fitting name.

Robbie Bell

Young People and Society Study Group

Due to industrial action, this meeting has been moved to Thursday 17th May  2018 between 1.45 and 4.00.

We have two speakers:

Professor Simon James, Department of English Studies, Durham University on Dickens’s Myths of Childhood. This presentation will consider theories of autobiographical memory in relation to literary texts by Charles Dickens. In particular, it will concern the importance to Dickens of adult mnemonic connection to childhood, and the role of the Blacking Factory in narratives of Dickens’s own development.

Professor Tony Chapman, St Chad’s College on Narratives about the successful life transitions of young people in County Durham.  The presentation will include discussion of new evidence on the provision of support to young people in County Durham by public, private and third sector organisations – asking whether the whole is worth more than the sum of the parts.

The presentations will take place in the Horsfall Room, Ramsay House, St Chad’s College, 26 North Bailey (a few doors down from the Main College St Chad’s College building).

 

 

Policy&Practice Annual Report 2017

It has been a busy year for us in Policy&Practice as several research projects have been completed and new ones started.

Key highlights of the year include the publication of a series of Third Sector Trends reports for Community Foundation Tyne & Wear and Northumberland, Joseph Rowntree Foundation and Garfield Weston / IPPR North.

A major new study Who Runs the North East Now? was published for Joseph Rowntree Charitable Trust, Institute for Local Government and Muckle LLP.

A new book was also published by the Commonwealth Secretariat on the Contribution of Sport to the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals.

We’re doing new projects for Lloyds Bank Foundation, Big Lottery Fund, Durham County Council and the Economic and Social Research Council  all with reports out next year.

Read all about it in our Annual Report by clicking here: Policy&Practice Annual Report 2017

Professor Kanji Tanimoto to visit St Chad’s in January 2018

In January 2018, Professor Kanji Tanimoto from Waseda University, Tokyo, will come to Durham on a two week research visit to St Chad’s College as a Visiting Professorial Fellow.  In addition to the  delivery of  a seminar on 18th January in St Chads, he will meet colleagues from Durham University Business School, Newcastle University Business School and Newcastle Business School (Northumbria University).  Meetings have also been arranged with the Institute for Advanced Studies, Teikyo University and the North East Initiative on  Business Ethics (NIBE).

Kanji Tanimoto is Professor in Business and Society at the School of Commerce, Waseda University, Japan. He recently was Visiting Professor at the Free University of Berlin, Cologne Business School and National Taipei University. Prior to joining Waseda, he was a professor at the Graduate School of Commerce, Hitotsubashi University. He received his doctorate in business administration from the Graduate School of Business Administration, Kobe University.

He is Founder and President of an academy: Japan Forum of Business and Society, which is the first academic society in this field in Japan. He is an editorial member of several journals. He serves on the program committee of the International Conference on Corporate Social Responsibility at Humboldt University. He has been consulting and providing advice to leading Japanese companies on CSR management over the last 20 years. He also has advised Japanese government committees on business & society and social business.

His research interests include the relationship between business and society, corporate social responsibility, social business and social innovation. He has published numerous books and papers.

His personal website is: http://tanimoto-office.jp and email address: k.tanimoto@tanimoto-office.jp

Alumni Events

St Chad’s Society Online Platform:

the best way to view events –alumni.stchads.ac.uk/events

See what’s coming up and book all in one place!

 

Forthcoming:

 

Thursday 1st Feb 2018: Law Alumni Group – inaugural meeting – 6.30pm at Foundry Chambers, 5-9 Quality Court, London. WC2A 1HP. Generously hosted by Jason Sugarman QC (87-90), our Law Alumni Group, for Chadsians working in the Law in all its forms, will gather for a legal networking evening. Places are strictly limited to 30. St Chad’s alumni only. To reserve a place: www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/st-chads-college-law-alumni-group-hosted-by-jason-sugarman-qc-tickets-39018717033

Looking ahead (do put these dates on your calendar):

8th-11th March 2018: Chadstide events in London, including our Thames boat cruise. More information soon.

Saturday 17th March 2018: Domus Dinner (For College Patrons, Foundation Fellows & Horsfall Benefactors, and by Principal’s invitation only).

Saturday 30th June 2018: 1904 Society Dinner, 7.30pm in College. For all former JCR and MCR Exec members, SCCBC captains and Candlemas stewards.

21st – 23rd Sept 2018: Decades Reunion in College, for all matriculation years ending in 8, and anyone pre-1965.

22nd Sept 2018: 12noon in College, Horfall Society (Legacy) Lunch. To thank you if you had left a gift to St Chad’s in your will.

13th – 15th Sept 2019: Decades Reunion in College, for all matriculation years ending in 9, and anyone pre-1966.